Louise Bourgeois — Seeing Red

Read More  |  28.06.18  |  Article by Lillian Wilkie  |  Art, culture  |  MM14

“Some of us are so obsessed with the past that we die of it. It is the attitude of the poet who never finds the lost heaven and it is really the situation of artists who work for a reason that nobody can quite grasp. They might want to reconstruct something of the past to exorcise it. It is that the past for certain people has such a hold and such a beauty…” — Louise Bourgeois

To coincide with an exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, Lillian Wilkie explores LOUISE BOURGEOIS' Red Sky series.

Image: Page from Modern Matter issue 14, The Mother Issue.
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When I Get Hold of an Idea, It Becomes My Reason to Live

Read More  |  28.06.18  |  Article by Olu Odukoya  |  Art, culture, interview  |  MM14

“I would say that I use the names as a tool, or as a shield. So I don’t take on that persona: it isn’t really about my reinventing myself, like The Great Gatsby or something, so that I become Spartacus Chetwynd. It might be like that for some people who use a pseudonym, or it might look like that from the outside; but to me, from the inside, it’s more like an incantation, or a spell. Or it’s like a weapon, or a coping mechanism.”

Born Alalia Chetwynd, the artist formerly known as Spartacus — and then latterly as Marvin Gaye — has chosen a new name: MONSTER CHETWYND.

Image by Olu Odukoya.
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I Want to Do as I like; Invent My Own Interests

Read More  |  28.06.18  |  Article by Bruce Hooton  |  Art, culture, interview  |  MM14

“I am not interested in the kind of expression that you have when you paint a painting with brush strokes. It’s all right, but it’s already done and I want to do something new.”

This interview with DONALD JUDD is extracted from a longer oral history, first conducted for the Archives of American Art at the Smithsonian in 1965, by the late Bruce Hooton.

Image: Donald Judd, untitled, 1963.

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The Camera Itself Has This Beautiful, Realistic Structure

Read More  |  28.06.18  |  Article by Michele Robecchi  |  Art, culture, interview  |  MM13

“The idea then evolved into something else – to make a sequence of images that would simultaneously include both the front and the back. It all happened by chance. And then I started to work out the concept more precisely, and to apply it to other subjects — photographs of aeroplanes, portraits, and the kind of images that normally show up in vintage newspapers.”

Marking his major 2017 show at The Whitechapel Gallery, the German titan-icon of photography THOMAS RUFF talks eBay, photographing space, and the Bechers.

Image: Porträt (P. Lappat), 1987.

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The Werewolf, in My Mind, Is the Most Humanlike Monster

Read More  |  28.06.18  |  Article by Philippa Snow  |  Art, culture, interview  |  MM13

“Then I started thinking, what would be the one object that would contrast with them the most? So I thought about a body part. Actually, I thought about a head, which I thought would be powerful enough, and would contrast with the coldness of the structure.”

The Canadian sculptor DAVID ALTMEJD on his mythical creations.

Image: Spacing Out, 2017.
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Throwback: John Baldessari

Read More  |  27.06.18  |  Article by Todd Coles  |  Art, behind the scenes, interview, video  |  MM6

In a 2012 film for Modern Matter magazine by Todd Coles, John Baldessari talks about technology in his Santa Monica studio.
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The Kind of Joy That’s Erupting out of Ruined Buildings

Read More  |  28.05.18  |  Article by Michele Robecchi  |  Art, culture, interview  |  MM12

“In a way, I was hoping it would be more painful and that it would extract more from me. Weirdly, in the end, it was kind of numbing. I didn’t make it to be cathartic –I didn’t expect to resolve anything.”

From Issue 12, Colour Model, Mark Leckey teaches Modern Matter how to spell 'ardcore.

Image: Hole-punched copy of Modern Matter, issue 12.
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Kanye Would Stay Kanye, and God Was God

Read More  |  28.05.18  |  Article by Seth Price  |  Art, culture  |  MM12

“In the art world, just as in sports or office culture, people adhered to well-structured models because ritualised forms were good at obscuring expressions of negation.”

First published in Modern Matter issue 12 — an extract from the conceptual novel Fuck Seth Price, by SETH PRICE.

Fuck Seth Price is published by Leopard Press. All artworks by the author.
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